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GROWTH IN GIVING ACCELERATES FOR THE IRISH NOT-FOR-PROFIT SECTOR IN 2018 — GIVING IRELAND 2020 REPORT LAUNCHED

Key Findings

  • Fundraised income increased 11%, rising for the 9th consecutive year
  • Ireland’s per capita giving is €255 compared to €398 in the U.K. and €353 in N.Z.
  • Transparency in the sector stagnated under the weight of compliance burdens
  • Average cost to raise €1 in 2018 was 29 cent, an increase on previous years

Giving Ireland is a collaboration between 2into3 and Philanthropy Ireland. The Giving Ireland 2020 Report was launched today. It gives a detailed analysis and insights on Funding of the Not-For-Profit Sector in 2018.

Formerly known as “The Irish Not-for-Profit Sector: Fundraising Performance Report”, this year’s report, launched on Wednesday 21st October, builds a year-on-year performance insight into fundraising by the Not-for-Profit sector in Ireland. …


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The European Day of Foundations and Donors brings together public benefit foundations, trusts, donors, philanthropists, local communities and volunteers across Europe who give time and resources to supporting others. By showcasing philanthropy’s contribution, the day aims to raise awareness about philanthropy and encourage more giving and civic action.

1st October is a moment to engage in a meaningful dialogue with the wider public. While we will be taking this opportunity to showcase philanthropy’s vital contribution, the day also encourages us to ask critical questions. Are we doing enough? Is philanthropy trust- and community-based? …


This new feature, shines a light on members of Philanthropy Ireland, their role, impact and how they are adapting to COVID-19. If you wish to spotlight your organisation please email niamh@philanthropy.ie

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Community Finance Ireland has invested €30 million in communities over the past four -year period.

A makeover for the annual ‘Willie Clancy Festival’ in Clare, an upgrade for Ballinasloe Town Hall Theatre, new equipment for the Dublin Cliffhangers Climbing Club in Finglas plus the first women’s dedicated playing field and changing facilities in Co. Armagh, our business collaborates with Change-makers right across the island of Ireland.

As a registered charity and a social enterprise our business is committed to creating a world class community finance system that ensures positive impact is felt — not just dreamt. …


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Recent events around the world including the corona-virus and political and racial unrest have drawn public attention to the inequality that exists in society today. Philanthropy has the opportunity to make society a more equal place for everyone to live. Through strategic and long term giving, philanthropy can support organisations who strengthen equality in our communities and help build a society where all people are treated and valued equally. The organisations supported by philanthropy, make real impact helping marginalised and minority groups by helping to remove the barriers these groups face throughout their lives.

Philanthropy Ireland member Rethink Ireland are at the forefront of facilitating change in Ireland through giving. Through their Equality Fund 2020–2023, Rethink Ireland seek to support civil society organisations who challenge the inequalities that exist in Irish society and who help create a country where everyone can feel accepted and thrive. …


Philanthropy Ireland asked members to share images from their beneficiaries, of examples of philanthropy throughout the Covid-19 crisis. The organisations featured give insight into the amazing work being done to support the most vulnerable in society.

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Foróige is a youth development organisation engaging over 50,000 young people and 5,500 volunteers. It’s purpose is to enable young people to involve themselves consciously and actively in their development and in the development of society. Through the Emergency Relief Fund generated by basis.point and Irish Funds, Foróige were able to continue empowering young people by donating care packages to communities across Ireland.

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Good Grub is a not-for-profit initiative delivering over 75,000 nutritious fruit & veg parcels directly to the families of DEIS school children around Ireland. With the help of the Emergency Relief Fund, Good Grub are able to maintain supporting vulnerable families during this critical time. …


Philanthropy Ireland Summer Members Networking Event

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In a world of increasing uncertainty collaboration is more and more essential. Exploring the theme presents opportunity to understand both the potential and challenges for effective collaboration on philanthropy initiatives. From straightforward information sharing to pooling of funding, collaboration can span a wide breadth of activity.

Addressing an online forum, Katie Boswell, Associate Director at NPC and Marcel Lauziere, CEO of the Lawson Foundation, explored the theme with Philanthropy Ireland members and colleagues. …


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The European Social Catalyst Fund (ESCF) is a new initiative designed to have significant impact on some of Europe’s most pressing social challenges. It has been established and co-funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, Genio (Ireland), the Robert Bosch Stiftung (Germany) and the King Baudouin Foundation (Belgium).

Now, more than ever, we need to identify ways of bringing together public and private resources (philanthropy and/or social investment) in a range of collaborations to help re-focus public spending in a more effective, evidence-based direction in the interest of European citizens. The spread of the COVID-19 virus across Europe and globally impacts everyone regardless of age, gender, race or wealth. However, our most vulnerable and disadvantaged citizens are most at risk and likely to be worst effected post-crisis due to significant strains on our economies, resources and services. …


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As the scale of the Covid-19 crisis continues to evolve and emerge so too the scale of needs to adequately respond are appearing increasingly overwhelming. While government must shoulder the primary burden of response, they cannot do it alone, we are all in this together.

All sectors of society have been impacted but it is the most vulnerable who are at greatest risk. The not for profit sector, champions of the marginalised and the vulnerable, is under unprecedented pressure. …


UPDATED 7th September*

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CONNECTING COMMUNITIES GRANT PROGRAMME VIA ST. STEPHENS GREEN TRUST

SSGT have opened applications for a limited grant programme for activities for children (Strand 1: Activities for Children living in DP), which will require the applicant group to get matched funding. Strand 2 of the Connecting Communities — Speak Up Speak Out — grant programme will take a broader approach to supporting positive change for people living in direct provision. SSGT also welcomes projects which support the voice of asylum seekers in Northern Ireland.

This grant programme is now open with a deadline for receipt of applications of Fri 25th Sept 2020. For more information click here.

COMIC RELIEF FUND, VIA THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION FOR IRELAND

DEADLINE: 30th September…


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Change Donation’s mission is to help people change the world through everyday spending. A community of everyday philanthropists donating one cent at a time to incredible causes that are inspiring positive change across the globe. Change Donations allows donors to give to their chosen charities by rounding up their card purchases to the nearest euro. Below, Change Donations gives PI great insight into “The Role of Tech in Giving”.

The technological renaissance that has occurred over the past 30 years has infiltrated and benefited all aspects of our lives. Innovation, automation, and digitization have revolutionized the way operate on a daily basis. However, the charitable sector has been left relatively unchanged. Sure, charities have added online direct debits or text-to-donate, but the fact that tap-to-donate collection buckets are considered bleeding edge technology is an indication of just how limited charities are on a technological level. I’m not calling for block-chain, machine learning, AI, or space travel, but when you compare the way we live to the way we donate, it feels like two completely different eras.

We live in an age of instant access to information, inter-connectivity, and overstimulation. Social media allows everyone to engage and interact with thousands of people every day. Checking your social pulse and digital identity have become as routine as brushing your teeth. We eat, sleep, and breathe technology, and have learned to digest information at an unprecedented rate. Whether we like it or not, we all have a digital profile. We all have a digital footprint. And we all have a public brand. Some say that this has led to vanity and disillusionment, and there is truth in that, but an optimist will see that this has helped make brands and companies more human to the eyes of consumers. People now talk to brands, and for the first time, brands are talking back.

People care. People want to help. So why are we seeing a reduction in donations (down 24% since 2010)? People have become accustom to convenience. If a process falls outside of the way an individual operates, he or she will remove it from their daily routine. So how does this apply to charities? Charities still rely heavily on cash donations (68% according to 2019 Global Giving Index). However, for most millennials and Gen-X’ers, cash is dead. This misalignment is a large reason why the average age of donors in Ireland is 62 years old.

The sad truth is that charities cannot afford an R&D department, and very few of them can afford to experiment with new technology. At the moment, charities operate 3–5 years behind curve when it comes to technology. Unfortunately for charities, not only has technology dictated our lifestyle, but the rate at which technology changes has increased significantly, exacerbating the gap between the way we live and the way charities interact with us. Think about it like this, most people under 25 have no idea what it’s like to go through life without an iPhone. If the iPhone is the new norm, charities and non-profits are still in the flip phone era. Flip phones work. You can still make calls and send texts, but it falls well beyond the convenience horizon that most donors are not willing to look past.

As of right now, charities have been using technology purely as a substitute for their processes: flyers and pamphlets have now become emails and social media posts, chuggers now collect credit card information in addition to cash, and the list goes on. …

About

Philanthropy Ireland

Promoting philanthropy & supporting our members as they disburse over €200m annually, to over 2,000 projects and communities in Ireland and overseas.

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